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Things You Must Know When It Comes To Organic Gardening

Ready to grow your own organic garden but unsure of what is the best way to proceed? Don't worry, here are some wonderful organic gardening tips! This collection of hints should provide you with practical advice that can be used in many settings.

To keep air flowing through your compost pile, stand a large PVC pipe with punched holes in the center of your pile so the air flows up and down the pipe, and then through the holes directly into the pile. The air movement helps your soil decomposers create the heat needed to jumpstart the decay process.

A great way to assure a successful organic garden year after year is to keep a gardening journal. You simply need to jot down what vegetables do well and those that don't, as well as certain pests or other issues that your garden runs into. By doing this, you'll know what to change or keep the same the following year, resulting in a gorgeous organic garden.

Weed control in your organic garden will be more challenging than a conventional garden because you can't use chemical herbicides. One of the best ways to control weeds without using chemicals is creating ground cover with mulch. Save tree trimmings and grass clippings from elsewhere in your garden and spread them around your plants to a depth of about 3 inches. This should be enough to prevent weeds from germinating and growing.

When growing organic plants hook your plants up to an electric timer that will turn lights on and off continuously throughout the day at the same time. By doing this, you will ensure that your plants receive the proper amount of light that they need.

If your garden shed is far from your garden, try to carry your frequently used tools with you. This will save you time by helping you avoid making many trips to your shed to get tools. If you will need more tools than you can carry, you could consider using a wagon or a bucket to hold all of your tools.

For indoor organic gardening, temperature control is very important during the early phases. Seventy degrees Fahrenheit is the ideal temperature for most seeds to start growing. You can achieve this temperature relatively easily by installing heaters and placing the seeds near the vents. You can also purchase heat mats to place under your plant containers.

Use living matter to make the best compost. Though you may be tempted to start tossing everything into your compost pile, don't do it. Remember your compost is not a trashcan. Put in plenty of grass clippings, fallen leaves, and kitchen garbage such as food scraps and old leftovers. This will make your compost process faster.

If you want to have great organic produce but are unable to grow it yourself, then you should be sure to check out your local farmer's market. These places always have a different rotation of produce but typically have great prices for some of the best products that you can find in the area.

When watering your tomatoes in your organic garden, you should always water them on the soil instead of the leaves. When you water the soil, the water goes down into the roots. The roots are the parts of the plant that need water and other nutrients. If you water the leaves, the water will not be able to get into the roots.

An old laundry basket makes a handy, if unlikely, addition to your organic gardening tools. You can collect produce in a laundry basket during harvest. Thanks to the openings in the basket, you can rinse the produce directly without worrying about any standing water collecting and spoiling your fresh fruit and vegetables.

Mix old or rotted food into your soil. Rotting food is just a sign that it's decomposing due to the bacteria that breaks down the starches and fats in the food. The food that you don't eat can provide your plants with a boost to their nutrition. Because the food is decomposing, the plants are even better equipped to strip vital nutrient it.

Plant "cut and come" vegetables. Plants such as loose-leaf lettuce and broccoli will continue to furnish you with a small harvest every week over an extended period of time. Simply pick what you need and let the plant do the rest. The more you pick, the more it will produce!

You don't just have to plant things that are going to be eaten by you in your organic garden. Try planting some flowers too. You can use annuals for one-season color. You do not want to use everywhere though since replacing a lot of them can be very expensive. Try planting them in a few small areas.

Make sure you are watering properly. To ensure optimum growth, the top 8 to 10 inches of soil need to be constantly moist. The amount of water you use will depend on your soil texture, and the hotter and windier, the more often you need to water. Water earlier in the day to allow plants to dry off, and check the moisture in your soil using a garden spade.

Try using organic matter for your organic garden. The best organic matter that you can use for your garden's bed preparation is a type of compost that is made from anything that used to be alive. Examples of this would be compost comprised of dead leaves, any kind of kitchen waste, or even grass clippings.

When it comes to taking care of an organic garden, then you need to opt for organic pest control. This is a comprehensive approach versus that of using chemicals. Try creating a healthier biodiversity so that you can help control the insects. When you use natural products and build healthier soil, you have the best long-term treatment for insects.

So, whether you are a new or experienced gardener, you've now got some ideas that you can implement in your garden. Few things in life are more satisfying than working the soil; and it's even more satisfying when you can do it nature's way.