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How To Grow A Beautiful Organic Garden

Many people see organic gardening as a way to contribute to the safe-keeping of our beautiful planet. For others it presents the opportunity to put nutrient-rich and chemical-free food on the table. Both are laudible reasons. Whatever your reason is, you may find that these suggestions really help.

If you live in the city, you can still reap the benefits of organic gardening through container gardening. Herbs especially will thrive in indoor pots, as long as they are large enough. Container gardening can be easier than outdoor gardening when going organic, as there is less risk of exposure to insect pests or weeds.

Keep your seeds warm and humid. Most seeds are healthy at a temperature of about seventy degrees. Place your pots next to a heating vent or install an additional heater if needed. You can cover your pots with plastic films so that the seeds can keep their humidity and warmth.

Fertilize your soil with organic compost. Organic gardeners tend to fertilize their soil twice in one season: once prior to planting, and then again in the middle of a growth cycle. The best fertilizer to use is an organic compost, as it releases nutrients slowly unlike chemical fertilizers, which release nutrients in one go and then lose their effect.

Planting a living hedge around your property has many benefits. Hedges provide a softer barrier to mark the perimeter of your property and are less forbidding than a structured wall. A living hedge will provide privacy but still discourage trespassing by animals or people. If you have a hedge that blooms, it can be a lovely backdrop in addition to your landscape.

Location is very important to organic gardening. Your garden should be in an area that will get at least ten hours of sunlight during the summer. Prior to starting your garden, make sure that your location does not have any large obstructions that will cast shadows and block the sun. Plants need an adequate amount of sunlight to live.

When you are thinking about starting an organic garden, figure out a plan. Creating a plan for where you want to place each plant will be time saving. If you have a short amount of time that can be spent in your garden, having a plan could help you make the most out of that time.

In order to offer your organic gardening the most success, mulch it with 3 inches of organic material. By mulching your organic garden you will conserve water, add nutrients to the soil and stop weeds from growing. As an added bonus, mulching also gives your organic garden a bit of beauty.

Add vines to your landscape. You can get a wide range of plants that are vines. Some ornamental, and some fruit or vegetable varieties. Vines can grow up most fences or structures. Use them to create more interesting landscapes in your yard. Have them grow up an awning, and create shade for you.

Although there are many organic weed killers available on the market, it is often best and a real money saver to pull weeds by hand. If you keep up with it regularly, you can easily pull weeds before their roots are established. Wear gloves and be sure to pull out both the foliage and roots.

Stay shallow in the soil when you are working it. You do not need to break your back digging deep in your organic garden. Keep your depth to an average of six inches. Nearly eighty-five percent of all plant roots only require the top six inches of soil. That should make your work easier.

Soaker hoses can make an outstanding addition to almost any organic garden. Soaker hoses allow the gardener to provide low-pressure watering over long periods of time to the plants that need it. When they take the place of hours of fussy hand-watering, such hoses are well worth the investment the gardener makes in them.

To control weeds in your garden without using chemical herbicides around your organic plants, mulch between rows with bark, clean straw, mulch-covered newspapers, or sawdust from untreated wood. Beware of using anything to mulch or fertilize that might contain seeds that can add more weeds, such as grass clippings or fresh manure.

Mix old or rotted food into your soil. Rotting food is just a sign that it's decomposing due to the bacteria that breaks down the starches and fats in the food. The food that you don't eat can provide your plants with a boost to their nutrition. Because the food is decomposing, the plants are even better equipped to strip vital nutrient it.

Enclosing your garden, say, in a hothouse or greenhouse will help you to keep pests out of your garden. The invasive plants, animals, and bugs are less likely to be able to get in. The problem is, greenhouses can be expensive. On the other hand, you gain the ability to plant all year round too, which can help offset the costs.

Are you having a hard time getting grass to grow in your organic garden? Will it just refuse to grow in the yard? Try looking for an appropriate ground cover to use on the exposed earth. Then you can just fill in the problem spaces and create interesting bed shapes.

To plant a shrub or tree, make sure the edges of the hole you dig are rough and uneven. If you place a plant in a hole with glazed sides, the roots will not be able to penetrate the soil properly.

When it comes to taking care of an organic garden, then you need to opt for organic pest control. This is a comprehensive approach versus that of using chemicals. Try creating a healthier biodiversity so that you can help control the insects. When you use natural products and build healthier soil, you have the best long-term treatment for insects.

The above list should have provided you with a some good ideas on becoming an even better organic gardener. It's great that you have such an interest in the subject. Going organic is 'green'; it is healthy, and it is enjoyable!